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How I cook for two...
Cooking For Two
How I cook for two...
Post your questions or comments on cooking in smaller portions here.
Our house is down to just my husband and me, so cooking smaller is necessary. However, I've learned that if I go ahead and cook for four, two servings can usually be frozen for later, or my husband wi
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Forums » Lifestyle » Cooking For Two » How I cook for two...

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Forums  »  Lifestyle  »  Cooking For Two  »  How I cook for two...

How I cook for two...

posted at 7/19/2011 11:41 AM CDT
Posts: 1
First: 7/19/2011
Last: 7/19/2011
Our house is down to just my husband and me, so cooking smaller is necessary. However, I've learned that if I go ahead and cook for four, two servings can usually be frozen for later, or my husband will take them to lunch later in the week. much less expensive than eating out, more nutritious, too! What do YOU do?

Re: How I cook for two...

posted at 7/19/2011 12:34 PM CDT
Posts: 2
First: 7/19/2011
Last: 7/19/2011
Pretty much thesame thing, except I have more leftovers 'cause it's just me.  I don't freeze much, because I have a small fridge, and no room for a freezer.  I just wrap it well and stick it in the fridge.  It certainly helps on the weekends for work.  I work twelve hour shifts, and eating in the cafeteria gets expensive, and there really isn't much choice on the weekend nights.

Re: How I cook for two...

posted at 7/19/2011 1:24 PM CDT
Posts: 2
First: 7/19/2011
Last: 9/6/2011
I always try to find a protein that I can make one way for one meal and then turn it into other meals for the next few days. For example, I buy bone in chicken breasts (cheaper than boneless, skinless and taste MUCH better). I buy the package with 5-6 breasts. I grill them all up, we will each eat one the first night. That night, I debone the other chicken breasts for chicken salad sandwiches, stir fry's, chicken for lettuce salads, shredded chicken for chicken and noodles, chicken tettrazinni, enchiladas, whatever floats your boat and requires chicken. It's both economical and time saving. I also make enchiladas and other casseroles in an 8x8 pan so I am not making too much.

Re: How I cook for two...

posted at 7/21/2011 3:06 PM CDT
Posts: 27
First: 7/13/2011
Last: 5/2/2014
In Response to How I cook for two...:
Our house is down to just my husband and me, so cooking smaller is necessary. However, I've learned that if I go ahead and cook for four, two servings can usually be frozen for later, or my husband will take them to lunch later in the week. much less expensive than eating out, more nutritious, too! What do YOU do?
Posted by daneen.t



I absolutely love your method of cooking once an eating twice! Preparing enough food for more than one meal is an excellent way to prepare properly portioned foods for you and your husband.  Some other ideas include:

 

Look for foods in smaller packages:

Buy foods that are packaged smaller or available in individual serving sizes.

More and more companies package food products in single or double servings for small households and individual meals and snacks.

Buying food in small containers can mean more food variety.  Instead of trying to use up one bigger package, enjoy the variety of several smaller ones.

 

Custom Shop:

Buy from bulk bins, produce displays, bakery or deli counters, or wherever. You can choose exactly what you want in the amount you need.

 

Visit the meat, seafood and produce cases:

Meat, produce, and seafood-counter staff, among others, can usually package food items in the amount you want.

 

Don’t be afraid of frozen foods:

Choose frozen foods that come in individual servings or containers you can re-seal. 

Frozen foods stay fresh for months so go ahead and buy that large bag of frozen fruit or vegetables.  Take out and thaw the single portion that you need.

 

Make meals convenient:

Instead of buying many individual ingredients, build menus with the convenience of mixed and ready-to-eat foods:  salad mixes, stir-fry mixes, herb blends, sauces and more.  They are not too costly in small amounts!

 

Find a shopping buddy:

If economy-sized packages or “buy one get one free” offers prove to be better deals, split them with a friend.

 

Repackage foods at home:

Stock up on sealable plastic bags, freezer wrap and plastic containers with tight seals.  Repackage bulk food items in right sized portions for you.  Then label and freeze the meat, poultry, fish and leftovers.

 

Get a cookbook:

Look for a cookbook or magazine that offers quick and easy recipes meant for one or two.  This way you won’t have to adjust recipes designed for four or more servings.

 

Cut recipes down to size:

Take a recipe designed for four and cut all the ingredients in half.

 

Equip your kitchen for small scale cooking:

Choose smaller kitchen equipment (pots, pans, and bowls) and appliances (food processor, coffee maker, and toaster).  They take up less kitchen space, too.

 

Use convenience foods:

Cut your food prep time by using some convenience foods, such as canned tuna, baby carrots, frozen vegetable mixes or pre-washed salad greens.

Don’t be afraid of pre-packaged meals:

Healthy choice, Kashi and Lean Cuisine make reasonable options and are in proper portion sizes.

Work well for occasional meals.  Do not use every meal of the day as sodium levels are high.

 

Get foods that can be used for 2 or more purposes:

This is different than making large batches and eating leftovers. Make a key food that can be used in one recipe the first night and an entirely different recipe within the next night or two.

Example: make a meatloaf but only use half of the meat.  Store the other half in the refrigerator and use the next day for meatballs or stuffed peppers.

Re: How I cook for two...

posted at 8/25/2013 7:24 AM CDT
Posts: 115
First: 7/25/2013
Last: 9/15/2013
It is so rare when I cook just for two since I have my husband and children with me at home. When I do there is something special going on. Practically, me and my husband spend most of our special days at home and I made it sure, I have something new to offer to him. Here are some recipes that you might like to prepare good for two.

-Rosetta

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