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Gluten-free flour blends
Gluten-Free
Gluten-free flour blends
Post your questions or comments on gluten-free products here.
Are there any gluten-free flour blends that can be used as a true "one-for-one" subsitute for regular all-purpose flour? Is it more cost-effective to purchase pre-made gluten-free flour blends, or to
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Forums » Special Diets » Gluten-Free » Gluten-free flour blends

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Forums  »  Special Diets  »  Gluten-Free  »  Gluten-free flour blends

Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 8/9/2011 3:17 PM CDT
Posts: 2
First: 8/9/2011
Last: 8/23/2011
Are there any gluten-free flour blends that can be used as a true "one-for-one" subsitute for regular all-purpose flour?

Is it more cost-effective to purchase pre-made gluten-free flour blends, or to use a recipe for making your own blend?  I've seen and purchased a number of gluten-free cookbooks which call for using their own recipe for a flour blend, but these blends often require quite a few ingredients, and look time-consuming and expensive to make.  In addition, each cookbook seems to call for something different.

Do some gluten-free flour blends -- whether homemade from a blend recipe or purchased -- taste and work better than others?  Are there any particular ingredients which tend to make a recipe better or worse?

I would welcome any good gluten-free flour blend recipes as well!

I have much to learn, so appreciate your help!


Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 8/10/2011 2:56 PM CDT
Posts: 72
First: 7/13/2011
Last: 4/17/2014
In Response to Gluten-free flour blends:
Are there any gluten-free flour blends that can be used as a true "one-for-one" subsitute for regular all-purpose flour? Is it more cost-effective to purchase pre-made gluten-free flour blends, or to use a recipe for making your own blend?  I've seen and purchased a number of gluten-free cookbooks which call for using their own recipe for a flour blend, but these blends often require quite a few ingredients, and look time-consuming and expensive to make.  In addition, each cookbook seems to call for something different. Do some gluten-free flour blends -- whether homemade from a blend recipe or purchased -- taste and work better than others?  Are there any particular ingredients which tend to make a recipe better or worse? I would welcome any good gluten-free flour blend recipes as well! I have much to learn, so appreciate your help!
Posted by dharvy


Yes, the gluten-free flour blends can be used at a 1-to-1 ratio. Try using a self-rising baking mix or pancake mix. Gluten-free flours can use the little boost in leavening and they already have the right amount of xanthan gum (needed for binding and texture). Pamela's or Namaste are good GF brands to try, there is also Arrowhead Mills, Domata and Bob's Red Mill as well.

Having talked with many gluten-free customers, many of them make their own bread flour blends from scratch because it is cheaper. Initially, it is pricey to gather all of your supplies but ingredients such as xanthan gum, you only use a small amount at a time so it will last awhile.

Here is a GF flour mix recipe that a "seasoned" GF customer gave me. She mixes up large batches and puts them in freezer bags for future uses.

Gluten-Free Flour Mixture
6 c. white rice flour
2 c. tapioca flour (not tapioca starch)
2 c. corn starch
1 tablespoon potato flour (not potato starch)

You will need to add a xanthan gum to keep your product from crumbling. A good rule to go by is adding 1/2 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make cakes, cookies, bars, muffins and other quick breads. Add 1 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make yeast bread, pizza dough and other baked items that call for yeast.

My customers bread recipe is as follows:

3 cups of GF bread mixture
2/3 cup dry milk powder
2 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoons unflavored gelatin

Mix these ingredients together by hand.

1 2/3 cups warm water
3 eggs (whisk slightly to break yolk)
1/2 stick butter or margarine, melted
1 teaspoon apple cider or rice vinegar

Place wet ingredients in bottom of bread maker, place dry ingredients on top. Make a slight bowl shaped indentation in the dry ingredients and add:

3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons yeast

Set your bread maker to light white or equivalent. Or, after the rise cycle pour dough into a bread pan that has been sprayed with a vegetable oil spray and bake in the oven at 350 degree for 50 minutes.

**To add more fiber, use 3/4 c. brown rice flour, 1/4 c. ground flaxseed and then 2 c. GF flour mixture in the recipe.

Please feel free to ask any additional questions!



Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 8/23/2011 10:09 AM CDT
Posts: 2
First: 8/9/2011
Last: 8/23/2011

Thanks very much for your helpful response!

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 8/28/2011 7:46 PM CDT
Posts: 2
First: 8/28/2011
Last: 3/31/2012
I have a followup question to this.  I'm new to the gluten-free diet & also recently discovered I'm allergic to poultry (including eggs.)  (Boy, what a shock to the grocery bill!!)  I see the recipe that was posted has eggs in it.  Is there an eggless version?  Also, I don't have a bread machine, nor do I want one.  Is there a conventional oven version of the recipe, as well?

I really do appreciate the first part of the recipe that has the flour mix you can substitute 1 to 1 for wheat flour!  Thanks for posting that!

Thanks for your help!

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 8/29/2011 2:06 PM CDT
Posts: 72
First: 7/13/2011
Last: 4/17/2014
In Response to Re: Gluten-free flour blends:
I have a followup question to this.  I'm new to the gluten-free diet & also recently discovered I'm allergic to poultry (including eggs.)  (Boy, what a shock to the grocery bill!!)  I see the recipe that was posted has eggs in it.  Is there an eggless version?  Also, I don't have a bread machine, nor do I want one.  Is there a conventional oven version of the recipe, as well? I really do appreciate the first part of the recipe that has the flour mix you can substitute 1 to 1 for wheat flour!  Thanks for posting that! Thanks for your help!
Posted by karen.shields5


Here are directions for making it without a bread machine.

1. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water (110 - 115 degrees)
2. Add all other ingredients, leaving out a portion of the flour.
3. Mix well until smooth.
4. Add remaining flour so that it forms a soft dough and pulls away from the bowl (may need to add additional flour if too moist).
5. On a lightly floured surface, knead dough until smooth and elastic.
6. Place in large bowl coated with cooking spray, turn once to coat the top of the dough.
7. Cover and let rise in a warm place until it doubles in size.
8. Punch down dough; shape dough, let it rise and bake at 350 degree for 50 minutes.

You can replace the egg with an egg substitute. Ener-G foods makes a commercial egg replacer, or you can use milled flaxseed. For 1 egg: 1 tbsp milled flaxseed + 3 tbsp water (Let sit for 2-3 minutes).

Hope this helps, happy baking!

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 10/30/2011 2:43 AM CDT
Posts: 1
First: 10/30/2011
Last: 10/30/2011
I got my sweet rice flour from an asian market as well (picked up my mae ploy yellow curry paste while I was there!) the regular markets don't carry it. maybe investigate, I had no idea we had an asian market because it is a little mom and pop place. Fred meyer however carries A LOT Of GF bob's red mill products up here


eczema

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 3/31/2012 2:16 PM CDT
Posts: 2
First: 8/28/2011
Last: 3/31/2012
In Response to Re: Gluten-free flour blends:
In Response to Re: Gluten-free flour blends : Here are directions for making it without a bread machine. 1. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water (110 - 115 degrees) 2. Add all other ingredients, leaving out a portion of the flour. 3. Mix well until smooth. 4. Add remaining flour so that it forms a soft dough and pulls away from the bowl (may need to add additional flour if too moist). 5. On a lightly floured surface, knead dough until smooth and elastic. 6. Place in large bowl coated with cooking spray, turn once to coat the top of the dough. 7. Cover and let rise in a warm place until it doubles in size. 8. Punch down dough; shape dough, let it rise and bake at 350 degree for 50 minutes. You can replace the egg with an egg substitute. Ener-G foods makes a commercial egg replacer, or you can use milled flaxseed. For 1 egg: 1 tbsp milled flaxseed + 3 tbsp water (Let sit for 2-3 minutes). Hope this helps, happy baking!
Posted by Alexandra Economy, RD, LD



Sorry for the long delay in getting back to you.  Since my last post, I've had great success with Ener-G egg replacer, which is actually a lot cheaper than the organic eggs I used to buy in pre-allergy days.  It's been an interesting journey restructuring my diet and making the financial adjustments to accomodate it, but God has continued to provide all of our needs.  Thanks so much for what you do!

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 9/4/2012 9:49 AM CDT
Posts: 19
First: 9/4/2012
Last: 9/6/2012
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Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 12/30/2012 10:13 AM CST
Posts: 1
First: 12/30/2012
Last: 12/30/2012
In Response to Re: Gluten-free flour blends:
In Response to Gluten-free flour blends : Yes, the gluten-free flour blends can be used at a 1-to-1 ratio. Try using a self-rising baking mix or pancake mix. Gluten-free flours can use the little boost in leavening and they already have the right amount of xanthan gum (needed for binding and texture). Pamela's or Namaste are good GF brands to try, there is also Arrowhead Mills, Domata and Bob's Red Mill as well. Having talked with many gluten-free customers, many of them make their own bread flour blends from scratch because it is cheaper. Initially, it is pricey to gather all of your supplies but ingredients such as xanthan gum, you only use a small amount at a time so it will last awhile. Here is a GF flour mix recipe that a "seasoned" GF customer gave me. She mixes up large batches and puts them in freezer bags for future uses. Gluten-Free Flour Mixture 6 c. white rice flour 2 c. tapioca flour (not tapioca starch) 2 c. corn starch 1 tablespoon potato flour (not potato starch) You will need to add a xanthan gum to keep your product from crumbling. A good rule to go by is adding 1/2 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make cakes, cookies, bars, muffins and other quick breads. Add 1 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make yeast bread, pizza dough and other baked items that call for yeast. My customers bread recipe is as follows: 3 cups of GF bread mixture 2/3 cup dry milk powder 2 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 teaspoons unflavored gelatin Mix these ingredients together by hand. 1 2/3 cups warm water 3 eggs (whisk slightly to break yolk) 1/2 stick butter or margarine, melted 1 teaspoon apple cider or rice vinegar Place wet ingredients in bottom of bread maker, place dry ingredients on top. Make a slight bowl shaped indentation in the dry ingredients and add: 3 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons yeast Set your bread maker to light white or equivalent. Or, after the rise cycle pour dough into a bread pan that has been sprayed with a vegetable oil spray and bake in the oven at 350 degree for 50 minutes. **To add more fiber, use 3/4 c. brown rice flour, 1/4 c. ground flaxseed and then 2 c. GF flour mixture in the recipe. Please feel free to ask any additional questions!
Posted by Alexandra Economy, RD, LD

As well as an allergy to wheat, I am lactose intolerant.  For making bread, or other baked products, I would need to replace the dried milk powder (powedered milk), what would I substitute?  Instead of using 1 2/3 C warm water, use warm soy milk?  What about the fat factor?  Oleo still has whey in it.  I'm guessing Crisco, probably butter flavored Crisco?  I also would like to know if there is something I could use instead of fat?  I'm supposed to avoid that, too.

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 1/1/2013 12:14 PM CST
Posts: 72
First: 7/13/2011
Last: 4/17/2014
In Response to Re: Gluten-free flour blends:
In Response to Re: Gluten-free flour blends : As well as an allergy to wheat, I am lactose intolerant.  For making bread, or other baked products, I would need to replace the dried milk powder (powedered milk), what would I substitute?  Instead of using 1 2/3 C warm water, use warm soy milk?  What about the fat factor?  Oleo still has whey in it.  I'm guessing Crisco, probably butter flavored Crisco?  I also would like to know if there is something I could use instead of fat?  I'm supposed to avoid that, too.
Posted by pk23441


Instead of trying to make substitutions with the recipe. I would recommend just trying another recipe that also is free of dairy. Here is one that I have found to have great reviews.

Gluten- and Dairy-Free Bread

All you need:

Dry Ingredients-
1 cup of brown rice flour
1 cup almond flour
¾ cup white rice flour
¼ cup tapioca flour
2 ½ teaspoons guar gum or xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons instant yeast

Wet Ingredients-
2 eggs
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon vinegar or lemon juice
1 - 1 ¼ cups warm water

Mix dry ingredients in food processor. Add the wet ingredients. Process until it is thick like a cake mix. Add more water as needed. Pour into pan and rise as high as ¾ of the pan. Bake at 350F for 30 minutes.

If you are looking for a pre-made bread available at Hy-Vee, I would recommend Udi's white and/or whole grain bread. Very popular among gluten-free customers. Let me know if you have any additional questions.

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 1/22/2013 3:24 AM CST
Posts: 1
First: 1/22/2013
Last: 1/22/2013
Gluten Free Palace has some great choices for gluten free baking mixes that you could look through. I've been ordering from them for about 5 months now and I've never been disappointed. Also, if you're looking for recipes, their website has several. :)

Re: Gluten-free flour blends

posted at 8/24/2013 8:12 AM CDT
Posts: 115
First: 7/25/2013
Last: 9/15/2013

Hi,

We know you cannot have everything you want in store anytime specifically with your concern about a gluten-free flour.

Here is a link where in you yourself can make a gluten-free flour anytime.

http://glutenfreegirl.com/2012/07/how-to-make-a-gluten-free-all-purpose-flour-mix/

I hope it helps.

-Rosetta

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